some corrections by David Maxwell trunk
authorabs <abs@pkgsrc.org>
Fri, 14 Jan 2000 10:32:35 +0000
branchtrunk
changeset 9701 c90c9819a85c
parent 9700 31186ed102bb
child 9702 9e326e7ab6a3
some corrections by David Maxwell
Packages.txt
README
--- a/Packages.txt	Fri Jan 14 09:20:47 2000 +0000
+++ b/Packages.txt	Fri Jan 14 10:32:35 2000 +0000
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-# $NetBSD: Packages.txt,v 1.79 2000/01/14 09:20:47 rh Exp $
+# $NetBSD: Packages.txt,v 1.80 2000/01/14 10:32:35 abs Exp $
 ###########################################################################
 
 			==========================
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@
 
  * The NetBSD package system:
    This is the part of the NetBSD operating system handling building
-   (compiling), installing and removing of packages.
+   (compiling), installing, and removing of packages.
 
  * Distfile:
    This term describes the file or files that are provided by the author
@@ -124,8 +124,8 @@
 Please consult your CDROM's documentation for the exact location!
 
 
- 1.2 How to do
- =============
+ 1.2 How to use
+ ==============
 
 If you have the files on a CDROM or downloaded them to your hard disk, you
 can install them with the following command (be sure to su to root first):
@@ -136,12 +136,14 @@
 prior to installation, you can do this automatically by giving pkg_add an
 ftp-URL:
 
-	pkg_add ftp://ftp.netbsd.org/pub/packages/`sysctl -n hw.machine_arch`/All/package.tgz
+	pkg_add ftp://ftp.netbsd.org/pub/NetBSD/packages/<OS Ver>/<arch>/All/package.tgz
 
-Please note that sysctl is used here to automatically determine the right
-set of binary files. Also note that any packages needed to run the package
-in question will be installed, too, assuming they are present where you
-install from.
+If there is any doubt, the sysctl utility can be used to determine the
+<OS Ver>, and <arch> by running "sysctl kern.osrelease hw.machine_arch".
+
+Also note that any prerequisite packages needed to run the package in
+question will be installed, too, assuming they are present where you install
+from.
 
 After you've installed packages, be sure to have /usr/pkg in your $PATH so
 you can actually start the just installed program.
@@ -183,12 +185,15 @@
 
 There is one gotcha: The distribution file (i.e. the unmodified source)
 must exist on your system for the packages system to be able to build it.
-If it's not, then ftp(1) is used to fetch the distribution files
+If it does not, then ftp(1) is used to fetch the distribution files
 automatically.
 
 You can overwrite some of the major distribution sites to fit to sites
 that are close to your own. Have a look at /usr/pkgsrc/mk/mk.conf.example
-to find some examples. This may save some of your bandwith and time.
+to find some examples. This may save some of your bandwidth and time.
+
+When you have selected your settings, install your configuration into
+/etc/mk.conf
 
 If you don't have a permanent Internet connection and you want to know
 which files to download, "make fetch-list" will tell you what you'll need.
@@ -211,7 +216,7 @@
 places on your system.
 
 Taking the top system utility as an example, we can install it on our
-system by building as shown in A.1.
+system by building as shown in appendix A.1.
 
 The program is installed under the default root of the packages tree -
 /usr/pkg. Should this not conform to your tastes, simply set the LOCALBASE
@@ -237,7 +242,9 @@
 
 Some packages look in /etc/mk.conf to alter some configuration options
 at build time. Have a look at /usr/pkgsrc/mk/mk.conf.example to get an
-overview of what you can set there.
+overview of what you can set there. Environment variables such as
+LOCALBASE, and X11BASE can also be set in /etc/mk.conf to save having
+to remember to set them each time you want to use pkgsrc.
 
 
  3 Making a precompiled package
@@ -424,7 +431,7 @@
 in the package directory.
 
 Besides taking care of any FreeBSDisms, be sure to provide patches to
-replace any occurance of /usr/local in any "Makefile"s in the original
+replace any occurrence of /usr/local in any "Makefile"s in the original
 package with ${PREFIX}.
 
 When you have finished a package, remember to generate the checksums
@@ -452,7 +459,7 @@
  * pkg/DESCR:
    A multi-line description of the piece of software.  This should include
    any credits where they are due.  Please bear in mind that others do not
-   share your sense of humour (or spelling idiosyncracies), and that others
+   share your sense of humour (or spelling idiosyncrasies), and that others
    will read everything that you write here.
 
  * pkg/PLIST:
@@ -718,7 +725,7 @@
 
 NetBSD supports many different machines, with different object formats
 like a.out and ELF, and varying abilities to do shared library and
-dynamic loading at all. To accompany this, verying commands and options
+dynamic loading at all. To accompany this, varying commands and options
 have to be passed to the compiler, linker etc. to get the Right Thing,
 which can be pretty annoying especially if you don't have all the
 machines at your hand to test things.  The "libtool" pkg can help
@@ -800,7 +807,7 @@
 
 One of the biggest problems with FreeBSD ports is that too many of
 them assume they will install into /usr/local, instead of honouring
-any ${PREFX} setting properly.  To change this, add something like the
+any ${PREFIX} setting properly.  To change this, add something like the
 following into your package Makefile:
 
 pre-configure:
@@ -939,7 +946,7 @@
    system calls, and library routines which are available in NetBSD. 
    This is the process known as configuration, and is usually
    automated.  In most cases, a script is supplied with the source,
-   and its invokcation results in generation of header files,
+   and its invocation results in generation of header files,
    Makefiles, etc.
 
    If the program doesn't come with its own configure script, one can be
@@ -1314,7 +1321,7 @@
 isn't specified, it defaults to ``install''. If the file contains a '/', it
 is interpreted as a regular file - otherwise, the name is taken to be an
 executable file, and the PATH is searched for <file>. If the regular file
-is not found, or the exectable file is not in the path, then the
+is not found, or the executable file is not in the path, then the
 pre-requisite package will be built from the sources in <directory
 containing the package to build>. The DEPENDS definition specifies a
 package name (which contains its version number), and the directory
@@ -1365,7 +1372,7 @@
 installed on his system, e.g. if your package installs the same set of
 files like another package in our pkgsrc tree.
 
-In this case you can set CONFLICTS to a space seperated list of packages
+In this case you can set CONFLICTS to a space separated list of packages
 (including version string) your package conflicts with.
 
 For example pkgsrc/x11/Xaw3d and pkgsrc/x11/Xaw-Xpm install provide the
@@ -1398,8 +1405,8 @@
 package's version number. If a package is already in pkgsrc at that time, 
 the md5 checksum will no longer match. The correct way to work around this
 is to update the package's md5 checksum to match the package on the master
-site (beware, any mirrors may not be upto date yet!), and to remove the 
-old distfile from ftp.netbsdorg's /pub/NetBSD/packages/distfiles directory.
+site (beware, any mirrors may not be up to date yet!), and to remove the 
+old distfile from ftp.netbsd.org's /pub/NetBSD/packages/distfiles directory.
 Furthermore, a mail to the package's author seems appropriate making sure
 the distfile was really updated on purpose, and that no trojan horse or so
 crept in.
--- a/README	Fri Jan 14 09:20:47 2000 +0000
+++ b/README	Fri Jan 14 10:32:35 2000 +0000
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-$NetBSD: README,v 1.8 1998/09/01 11:03:23 agc Exp $
+$NetBSD: README,v 1.9 2000/01/14 10:32:35 abs Exp $
 
 Welcome to the NetBSD Packages Collection
 =========================================
@@ -27,11 +27,11 @@
 at ways to remove this restriction.
 
 + To install a package on your system, you need to change into the
-directory of the package, and type "make && make install".
+directory of the package, and type "make install".
 
 + If you've made a mistake, and decided that you don't want that
 package on your system, then type "pkg_delete <pkg-name>", or "make
-deinstall".
+deinstall" while in the directory for the package.
 
 + To find out all the packages that you have installed on your system,
 type "pkg_info".
@@ -40,6 +40,10 @@
 clean-depends" will clean up any working directories for other
 packages that are built in the process of making your package.
 
++ Optionally, you can periodically run "make clean" from the top
+level pkgsrc directory. This will delete extracted and built files,
+but will not affect the retreived source sets in pkgsrc/distfiles.
+
 + You can set variables to customise the behaviour (where packages are
 installed, various options for individual packages etc), by setting
 variables in /etc/mk.conf.  The pkgsrc/mk/mk.conf.example file
@@ -58,7 +62,7 @@
 
 Another way to find out what packages are in the collection is to
 move to the top-level pkgsrc directory and type "make index". This
-will create pksrc/INDEX which can be viewed via "make print-index | more".
+will create pkgsrc/INDEX which can be viewed via "make print-index | more".
 You can also search for particular packages or keywords via
 "make search key=<somekeyword>".
 
@@ -71,5 +75,17 @@
 where <release> is the NetBSD release, and <arch> is the hardware
 architecture.
 
+One limitation of using binary packages provided from ftp.netbsd.org
+is that all mk.conf options were set to the defaults at compile time.
+
+LOCALBASE, in particular, is the default /usr/pkg, so non-X binaries
+will be installed in /usr/pkg/bin. Man pages will be installed in
+/usr/pkg/man...
+
+When a packaged tool has major compile time choices, such as support
+for multiple graphic toolkit libraries, the different options may
+be available as separate packages.
+
 For more information on the packages collection see the file
-Packages.txt in this directory.
+Packages.txt where you found this README, or in your top-level pkgsrc
+directory.